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Bloggers Club November 2022 — Three things that have helped me demonstrate the value I bring to a team

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How come it’s not so obvious what we do, how we help a team/customers, and the value we bring? The work presented by the developers is more tangible, the same goes for many other professions such as designers, where they have a visual output of their work. For testers, this is different, since testing is not that visible to the customer, or sometimes the management. Testers can shed light on their activities by advocating quality and being proactive communicators - try speaking to everyone in their own language. For example, developers will wholeheartedly agree that good software architecture has a direct positive impact on the app's testability and overall quality - a well-architectured app will have a lot fewer bugs to find in the first place. And when dealing with managers, translate everything into the language of money. How much will the company lose, if a certain feature doesn't get the (minimum) testing needed after we have assessed and accepted the risks we discover. Wh

What can software testers put in their portfolio website?

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I recently came across a forum topic about a QA portfolio and what it should look like. Since i t is a bit more demanding for us testers than it is for designers and developers, to have presentable work for our portfolios. They just put work samples of apps they designed and developed, and for us testers we need to get a bit more creative: If you have your own blog or write articles for others you can showcase those on your portfolio Any public speaking activities you should display as well, such as meetups, conferences, workshops, etc. Also, if you are a volunteer or a member of any testing communities I’d show that too. If you know automation or are learning it, you can include links for GitHub repositories with your automation code - just try to add a bit of variation, do some UI, and some API automation, and play around with different frameworks to demonstrate that you are a keen learner. You can get even more original and add samples of how you perform regular QA tasks, a sample

Bloggers Club October 2022 - Trick or treat - Irreproducible Bug

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 Let me tell you a spooky story about an irreproducible bug. It took a place a long time ago, before seven companies, and seven projects, there stood an irreproducible bug! At the time this happened I was working on a fairly large enterprise project,. The whole system was made up of various applications, written in a few different languages, over time, by many different teams.  The core defect was a bit of an edge case, where just users with certain country codes would not get eCommerce promotional emails sent to them. It was a wild goose chase, I was the first to investigate the bugs, as I was in the application support team at the time, about 20 hours per week. I tried in different environments, but to no avail - I could not figure it out. Used a test harness to trick the dates, as it was a kind of email that gets sent 24 hours after registration. I got very stubborn about it and spent about 4 hours without getting up from my chair, trying to figure out the root cause. Why was this e

Helpful Resources for Junior Software Testers

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 In this blog post, I just want to share a list of resources, for learning software testing. An excellent book on Agile Testing, by Lisa Crispin and Janet Gregory: https://www.amazon.com/Agile-Testing-Practical-Guide-Testers/dp/0321534468 BBST courses are a great way to tackle fundamental concepts behind testing https://bbst.courses/videos/ Awesome book on Exploratory Testing, by Maaret Pyhäjärvi https://leanpub.com/exploratorytesting Nice course to get a broad idea about testing, Udemy has a lot of similar courses and they have sales all the time: https://www.udemy.com/course/the-complete-quality-assurance/ Prep for ISTQB certificate, useful to get to know the terminology and theory https://www.amazon.com/Foundations-Software-Testing-ISTQB-Certification/dp/1844803554 ISTQB syllabus - if you are learning for the CTFL and if it's in demand in your market https://www.istqb.org/certifications/certified-tester-foundation-level Pluralsight has a certification path for ISTQB CTFL a

TestRigor - Review

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Full honest disclaimer: I haven’t used many no-code automation tools, and the ones I’ve used have always been just out of curiosity, and I never went deep into any of those tools until now. I’m a QA who’s mainly focused on working with coded test automation frameworks and never had much time to look into such tools. So when the folks from testRigor approached me with a question if I would like to try out their tool, I was curious although a bit skeptical.   While in the past I disregarded any no-code automation tools, as I didn’t have a need for them, in more recent years I’ve become more open to the idea of giving such tools a try. There is a time and place for everything, and coding a complete automation framework can be a waste of resources - unless you produce it exceptionally specific in terms of testing. Hence, you need to utilize all the customization that is available to you. One of the reasons I changed my mind about tools like this one, was the fact that a couple of people in

3 Things That Have Helped Me in My Testing Career - MoT Bloggers Club June 2022

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Here are the three things that have helped my testing career: Building good relations with people I work with - from personal experience, is what has helped me the most in my career. People remember if they enjoyed having you as their team member and working alongside you. I always advocate that you should be polite and considerate towards everyone you work with, and never burn bridges behind you, as you never know when a previous co-worker can be your future co-worker as well, when you change companies. I got quite a few referrals from previous co-workers when they moved to new companies, and I recommended people who I worked with, so it goes both ways! Learning Continuously - about 5-6 years ago I tried hard to make a habit of trying my best to learn something new (almost) every day, the reason for this is because I'm lazy, and on the other hand people say consistency is the key to learn new things. If you spend 30 minutes daily learning test automation, in a year you will know

10 Tips for Designing Better Test Cases

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For most testers, designing, executing, and maintaining test cases are regular activities, this is especially true for new testers and those in the early stages of their career. This post is inspired by some documentation I worked on, in an effort to standardize the testing process in one of my previous jobs. Bear in mind that in each company the approach to handling test cases can differ significantly, old-school (Waterfall-like) enterprises might favor very long and detailed test cases, where each step required to execute the test cases is described in great detail, to more Agile environment where testing is moving at a faster pace, so test cases in Agile are shorter and more concise. There is a great course at the MoT on this topic called  Optimising Manual Test Scripts For An Agile Environment , by Match Archer, the course is not too long and it's full of useful info, I'd highly recommend it. There is also a third alternative - no test cases at all! This has been a trend in